Medieval Naples
A Documentary History
400–1400

Edited by
Ronald G. Musto

Illustrations   ix
Abbreviations   xii
Preface xiii
Introduction: Between Rome and Aragon. Naples 400–1400 xvii
  Late Roman and Byzantine Naples (325–568) xxi
  Ducal Naples (568–1139) xxv
  Urbanism and the Arts, 600–1100 xxxiv
  The Normans (1139–94) xli
  Urbanism and the Arts, 1100–1200 xlvi
  The Hohenstaufen (1194–1266) lii
  The Angevins (1266–1442) lvi
  Literate Cultures in Naples lxxiii
     
CHAPTER 1: LATE ROMAN AND BYZANTINE NAPLES 1
1. The last Roman emperor of the West deposed and exiled to Naples, 476 ce 1
2. Severinus of Noricum is buried in Naples, 482 3
3. Sta. Restituta founded, c.500 5
4. Cassiodorus, Variae, c.530 6
5. Eugippius and Hagiography, c.533 9
6. On the Baths at Baiae and the Bay of Naples, c.534 11
7. Belisarius conquers Naples from the Goths, 536 13
8. The sack of Naples, 537 28
9. Naples repopulated by refugees of the Gothic Wars, 537/38 29
10. Mount Vesuvius, 537 31
     
Chapter 2: Ducal Naples 33
  Introduction 33
11. Gregory the Great, letters, 590–604 33
 

Book II, letter 46. To John, bishop of Ravenna, c.592

35
 

Book III, letter 1. To Peter, subdeacon of Campania, c.592

36
 

Book III, letter 35. To Peter, subdeacon of Campania, c.592

38
 

Book VI, letter 32. To Fortunatus, bishop of Naples, 593–600

39
 

Book IX, letter 36. To Fortunatus, bishop of Naples

40
 

Book X, letter 24. To Fortunatus, bishop of Naples

42
 

Book X, letter 62. To the Neapolitans

43
 

Book XIII, letter 12. To Paschasius, bishop of Naples, 600–615

44
12. The revolt of John of Compsa, 618/19 46
13. Paul the Deacon on John of Compsa, 619 47
14. Naples as a Byzantine military base, 663 47
15. Naples retakes the fortress of Cumae, 716 49
16. Duke Stephen (II) seeks a home, 763 51
17. Paul the Deacon and hagiography, c.750 52
18. The Pactum Sicardi, July 4, 836 59
19. The Battle of Ostia, 849 63
20. The Life of Bishop Athanasius I by John the Deacon, 872 65
21. Giovanni III and Theodora build their library, 947 69
22. The Romance of Alexander by Pseudo-Callisthenes, c.950 73
23. Duke Giovanni III grants an estate, 951 76
24. Vesuvius erupts on the death of Giovanni III, 969 79
25. Sergius VI makes grants to S. Gregorio Armeno, 1084 80
26. The Pactum of Sergius VII, 1130 81
     
Chapter 3: The Normans 85
  Introduction 85
27. Anacletus II’s privilege to Roger II, authorizing the creation of the kingdom of Sicily, September 27, 1130 85
28. Roger II attacks Naples, 1130–36 88
29. Virgil’s bones protect Naples, c.1136 96
30. The Exultet in Naples, c.1150 98
31. Florio e Biancofiore, c.1150 100
32. Abû ‘Abdallâh al-Idrîsî in Campania, c.1150 102
33. Benjamin of Tudela in Campania, c.1165 104
34. The Song of Aspremont, c.1190 107
     
Chapter 4: The Hohenstaufen 113
  Henry VI 113
35. Henry VI invades the Regno, 1191  
36. Peter of Eboli, The Baths of Pozzuoli, c.1195–1220 117
37. Conrad of Querfurt describes Naples, c.1196 119
  Frederick II 125
38. The life of Frederick II, from Giovanni Villani, 1220 126
39. Frederick II founds the University of Naples, June 5, 1224 135
40. Neapolitans in the Sicilian School of poetry, 1230–66 138
41. Two commercial insurance contracts, 1261 141
     
Chapter 5: The Angevins 145
  Charles I 145
42. Charles of Anjou conquers Naples, 1263–65 146
43. Conradin’s invasion of the Regno and his death in Naples, 1268 160
44. Thomas Aquinas, Treatise on Law, c.1270 172
45. The Angevins in Morea, 1278 176
46. The Sicilian Vespers, 1282 180
47. Adam de la Halle’s Jeu de Robin et Marion, 1283 182
  Charles II 188
48. Charles II and his reign, 1285 189
49. Celestine V abdicates in Castel Nuovo, 1294 190
  Robert of Anjou 192
50. How Robert was crowned king over the kingdom of Sicily and Apulia 195
51. King Robert expels prostitutes from central Naples, 1314 195
52. King Robert addresses the Genoese, July 27, 1318 196
53. The Villani collect papal revenues, May 5, 1324 200
54. Robert of Anjou attempts to regain Sicily, 1325 201
55. King Robert’s cavalcades, June 27, 1334 202
56. Queen Sancia of Naples (1286–1345) writes to the chapter general of Assisi, July 25, 1334 204
57. King Robert’s edict on youth fashion, January 15, 1335 212
58. Construction at Sta. Chiara and Belforte, 1338 215
59. The campanile of Sta. Chiara begun, 1338 216
60. Famine in Naples, 1338/39 217
61. Francesco Balducci Pegolotti, La pratica della mercatura. On trade conditions in Naples, c.1338–43 218
62. Giovanni Boccaccio’s Neapolitan letter, 1339 224
63. Petrarch on Naples, c.1341 227
64. Papal revenues raised from Naples, December 1341 231
65. King Robert’s last will and testament, January 16, 1343 234
66. Robert of Anjou’s death and legacy, January 20, 1343 254
  Giovanna I 256
67. Giovanna I is engaged to Andrew of Hungary, 1333 258
68. Giovanna I grants a medical license to Maria Incarnata, May 7, 1343 259
69. Petrarch recounts his tour around the Bay of Baiae, October 1343 261
70. Petrarch describes the tidal storm on the Bay of Naples, November 25, 1343 263
71. The Cronaca di Partenope describes the same 266
72. Petrarch describes Naples under Giovanna I, December 1, 1343 266
73. Boccaccio’s Naples, c.1343 269
74. Prince Andrew of Hungary is murdered at Aversa, September 18, 1345 274
75. Giovanna I on the murder of Andrew of Hungary, September 21, 1345 274
76. Domenico da Gravina describes the execution of Giovanna I’s court officials, late March 1346 275
77. Giovanna’s exile to Avignon and her return, 1348–52 278
78. Boccaccio’s literary geography, c.1355 286
79. Giovanna I founds Sta. Maria Incoronata and renovates Castel dell’Ovo, 1363 287
80. Giovanna I requests relics for Sta. Maria Incoronata, 1364/67 289
81. Giovanni Boccaccio’s Life of Giovanna I, c.1375 291
  Charles III 298
82. Charles III of Durazzo conquers Naples, 1381 299
Chapter 6: Literate Cultures 303
     
Bibliography   315
  Bibliography of Texts 315
  Other Primary Sources Cited 319
  Secondary Works 321
 

General and Multiperiod

321
 

Late Antiquity

325
 

The Ducal Period

328
 

The Normans

330
 

The Hohenstaufen

332
 

The Angevins

333
     
  Map of Naples and Campania 344
Appendices   345
  Online Resources 345
  The Tavola Strozzi 346
  Map of Medieval Naples 349
  Alphabetical Key to Map 350
Index   355




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